Monday, 26 January 2015, 3:19 am

Asper’s vision comes to life 14 years later

By JULIET KADZVITI
Staff Writer
The second level has a multi-faceted timeline that features historical ideas of what human rights are from prominent figures such as Mahatma Gandhi. PHOTO BY JULIET KADZVITIIt took 14 years for media mogul Izzy Asper’s vision for a multicultural human rights museum to come to fruition. He died in 2003 before he could see this dream realized.
The newly opened and controversial Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) went through many obstacles before its grand introduction on Sept. 20 last year.
“We open these doors so that all who enter will be reminded of a simple but profound truth – we can make a difference in this world,” said Stuart Murray, the previous museum president and chief executive officer, according to a press release.
This sentiment was not shared by everyone. From accusations of discrimination (Tom Brodbeck for The Winnipeg Sun stated that free entrance for Aboriginal people is “odd and a bit shocking”) to alleged overspending (according to Global News it cost over $351 million to build), the state-of-the-art museum has had its...

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Selma brings civil rights to a new audience

By TORI RUTHERFORD
Staff Writer
Selma is a historical drama film directed by Ana Duvernay about the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery, AL led by Martin Luther King Jr. to achieve equal voting rights for African Americans in the southern states.
As the actor portraying President Lyndon B. Johnson, Tom Wilkinson states, in the first meeting featured in the film with King, played by David Oyelowo, the right to vote had already been granted, which King knew. He also knew basic rights were not reinforced in the southern states, where men of the law often acted to keep citizens from registering to vote. This also meant they could not serve on a jury, which had its own implications.
The city of Selma was chosen specifically for the brutality of its local law enforcement under orders of Sheriff Jim Clark, played by Stan Houston. 
The film depicts several of these brutal events during which peaceful...

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Fans prepare for final ride after seven seasons

By CARLY MCHUGH
Staff Writer
Sons of Anarchy’s final episode “Papa’s Goods” will air on Dec. 9. SUBMITTED PHOTOOn Dec. 9, Sons of Anarchy fans will be in full throttle for the show’s series finale.
Everything has led to this, the end of the seventh and final season colourfully referred to as the “Final Ride”. Fans hope that all questions will be answered before the show comes to a bittersweet end.
“I feel ending the show is a mistake because it is so good,” said Joshua Harwood, a Brock University student. “I feel like they rushed the plot. It would have been nice to have more of an origin story with Jax’s dad.”
Throughout the course of the show, viewers have followed Jax Teller in his quest to carry on a legacy while struggling with the moral imbalance of running Sons of Anarchy Motorcycle Club Redwood Original (SAMCRO).
One of the main touch points of the show has been the truth behind the death of Jax’s father, John. As...

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Niagara College graduate lands her Disney fairy tale when cast for voice acting on cartoon series

By JAMIE BURTON
Staff Writer
Elana Catherine transformed her passion into a career thanks to hard work, a bit of luck and time well spent at Niagara College. Photo by Jamie BurtonTwenty-two-year-old Elana Catherine has taken her Niagara College education and combined it with inspiration from idols such as Tara Strong to land her dream job: voice acting on a cartoon series. 
Graduate of the Acting for Film and Television program, Catherine will be playing the role of Sparky, a canine character on the upcoming children’s series Chirp, which will begin to air in the spring on TVO. Earning the role of a recurring character on a 52-episode series has been a huge learning experience for Catherine, but her path to this point hasn’t always been the sure-fire trajectory she envisioned.
Hailing from the appropriately named small town of Tiny, Ont., Catherine always had aspirations of stardom in the world of acting and voice. As a child, she would stealthily follow people she spotted on the streets, mimicking their movements and voice. Growing up, she saw little to quell the...

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One grand of international funds for five

By TORI RUTHERFORD
Staff Writer
Jeff Burch and Melenie Neamtz stand in the Niagara Folk Arts Multicultural Centre, ready for applications. PHOTO BY TORI RUTHERFORDGood news for newcomers to Canada, the Niagara Folk Arts Multicultural Centre (NFAMC) is giving away five $1,000 bursaries in May.
The Niagara Newcomer Bursary (NNB) is for students who are new to Canada or have lived here for less than 10 years.
Although the funding only came through approximately six months ago, Youth Services Co-ordinator Melenie Neamtz has wanted to create something to help newcomer youth since she took the position in 2008.
“When I took on this position I wanted to be able to offer something back to the newcomer youth because I have seen a need and it grows over the years as you get more clients and there’s less jobs and fewer opportunities. To be able to offer some kind of help is something that we’ve wanted to do for some time now.”
Private donors, who wish to remain anonymous, made the bursary possible. 
Executive Director Jeff Burch...

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The Game’s the thing

By JAMIE BURTON
Columnist
J.J Mazi, Terrence Hill and Adon Ruckle zoned in on Super Smash Bros. for 3DS. PHOTO BY MAZIE BISHOPControversy, billion-dollar buyouts and rereleases galore encompass 2014 in gaming, but a string of quality new titles saves the year from being a complete wash out.
As video games continue to expand their influence over pop culture and gain in popularity, more and more elements of its seedy underbelly come to the surface.
This summer saw the emergence of the GamersGate controversy that began as a conflict of interest between game journalists and game developers, but quickly snowballed into a stance on misogyny in gamer culture.
Not all of 2014’s controversies were as widespread into social justice as GamersGate. 
Ubisoft was the target of overwhelming waves of hatred on two separate occasions. The release of Watch_Dogs in June was met with hostility as the final version of the game was not nearly as polished or good looking as the E3 demo shown in 2013. 
Their second bout with controversy hit in November...

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Photography tutorials capture Niagara

By BAYLEY NARGANG
Staff Writer
It benefits more than just the photographers, Sarah Ann Smith applies make-up to model Sarah Burgess. PHOTO BY PHIL CHEEVERSTechnology’s accessibility has made it harder to develop high-grade talents in any artistic field. Anyone can pick up a camera and call themselves a photographer, but why not do it in an atmosphere where you can learn from professionals?
On the first Friday of each month, Niagara Fotoz takes place at various locations around the Niagara region, the most recent of which was at Mahtay Café in downtown St. Catharines.
The people providing the professional studio equipment are Seann Alexander and Phil Cheevers, self-proclaimed co-founders by accident.
The success of this program has made progress in more than just St. Catharines though, Cheevers said. “We’ve had a lot of people from Niagara Falls. … We’ve had about two sessions there now.”
Niagara Fotoz was started by the duo, with the hope they can have practice time in a studio setting. However, that is definitely not the only goal.
By creating...

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