Sunday, 01 February 2015, 9:38 am

Classic rock will transcend generations

By TORI RUTHERFORD
COLUMNIST
Having a father born in 1954, my brother and I grew up a little bit differently than most of our childhood friends.
I would call classic rock the soundtrack to our childhood without so much as a second thought. From the time I was born, car rides were filled with songs made famous by bands such as Yes, The Who, The Beatles and The Rolling Stones.
During spring-cleaning we listened to Led Zeppelin, Creedence Clearwater Revival and The Doors. Our first MP3 players were full of music that our friends had never heard.
While our friends were dancing to the melodies of The Backstreet Boys and N’Sync, we were learning how to dance along with Michael Jackson’s Thriller video, which I still know by heart.
To say my father is a hippie would be a massive understatement. At 60 years old, he sports wavy brown hair to his shoulders, and a...

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Lacking acts, rock music in decline

By LUCA GUARDARI
Columnist
Classic rock albums re-released on vinyl are at highest sales levels since 1992. PHOTO BY LUCA GUARDARILong are the golden years of rock ‘n’ roll, when you could turn on the radio and hear new songs by The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, The Doors or Elvis Presley.
There will never be bands that could accomplish a cult following as the legendary acts listed above. It begs the question throughout the music world; is rock ‘n’ roll dead?
Sure, there are bands from the late ‘60s/’70s like The Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd and AC/DC that are trying to make a comeback.
Pink Floyd and AC/DC both just released new albums but they are struggling to chart on airwaves.
There is U2, a band releasing music consistently for the past 35 years still proving to be relevant to the music world; even if it’s by causing an uproar by delivering a free album to 500 million iTunes users.
The band is still wanted by many, but, emerging artists are finding...

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Niagara college’s lack of healthy options makes it tough for students to keep their new year’s resolution

By LUCA GUARDARI
Columnist
Niagara College’s health wise selection cooler in the cafeteria gets a steady stream of interested students checking its contents. PHOTO BY LUCA GUARDARINew Year, new me. These four words have been spread all over social media since the start of the new year, but is it possible to keep this resolution thriving while at school?
Attached to this New Year’s resolution comes laid out dedication to eat better, work out and to forget mistakes from the previous year.Niagara College has a wide variety of different types of food, ranging from healthy options to bad ones. 
What could tip a student’s hunger against their resolution is the fact that healthy foods at the college are expensive, while fatty, sugary foods are cheap.
Wiser beverage choices, like vitamin water or smoothie drinks, cost around three dollars and up, while pop brands loaded with sugar and carbohydrates are within a two-dollar range.
Health wise pitas go for five to eight dollars, without a combo, with a standard cheese and pepperoni slice of pizza costing $4.50...

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Keep it PG on the buses

By CHRIS BREEN
Columnist
Keep it family friendly.
How many people have stepped onto the local transit only to hear from the back of the bus someone drop an f-bomb?
This is becoming a common occurrence on public transit. Parents with young children know the sting that public vulgarity deals. As a parent, I have been in the situation where I have had to explain to my children why certain words are not appropriate or have them ask me the meaning of words they wouldn’t hear at home.
Sometimes the glare of a disgusted patron will silence an f-bomb dropper or a polite, “Could you not speak like that in front of my child?” but most of the time they are ignored.
Not too long ago I was privy to see a bus driver who had had enough. A group of teenagers spent a good deal of their ride using vulgar language and speaking...

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Growing up not-so-Gotti

By Bayley Nargang
Columnist
“This isn’t what I thought I was getting into” thought the student with too much debt to handle. ILLUSTRATION BY EMILY DAKINI remember it vividly. Jan. 4, 2001. My ninth birthday. It was first thing in the morning when I was woken abruptly by my father shaking me.
I opened my eyes. He triumphantly exclaimed, “You’re halfway to getting the hell out of my house!”
Yet, I sit here now, a 22-year-old man, and nearly $30,000 in debt. Face to face with the facts, I am most likely going to have to spend another year living at home.
So, what is growing up when we are all statistically destined to return to the proverbial nest anyway?
It’s hard to be in the modern media field, one can know too much. Statistics Canada produced an assessment entitled Living Arrangements of Young Adults aged 20 to 29.
It reads, “The 2011 Census of Population showed that 42.3% of the 4,318,400 young adults aged 20 to 29 lived in the parental home.” Most importantly, this...

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Preserving the right to say stupid, vile, offensive things

By JOEL OPHARDT
Columnist
SUBMITTED PHOTO ILLUSTRATIONFrance is trendsetting once again.
Following the deadly Charlie Hebdo shooting, the “Je suis Charlie” movement has rebranded free speech as a modern response to barbarism.
Ironic, considering the French government was arresting people for using free speech to defend terrorism just last week.
The French government isn’t alone with this type of hypocrisy.
Violating sections 318 and 319 of the Criminal Code of Canada could have Canadian citizens serve two years in prison for expressing themselves similarly.
Yes, these are Canada’s hate speech laws, and they don’t exactly come off as unreasonable when you read through them yourself.
Advocating genocide, public incitement of hatred and wilful promotion of hatred is not acceptable to sane individuals but to make them illegal as a form of expression is going a step too far.
The problem with these laws is not the spirit in which they are written, but their potential for abuse by the government.
The...

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Our ice has never been so hot

By CHRIS PERELLI
Columnist
Team Canada’s Mark Stone celebrates one of the eight goals scored in the 2012 World Junior Championships held in Alberta versus Finland. SUBMITTED PHOTOThere’s no doubt that Canada will be a favourite to win the 2015 IIHF World Junior Championships, but based on previous efforts, they certainly aren’t a lock to win.
Every year, Canada sends some of the best players in the world to this tournament and, on paper, should blow away the competition. However, since their World Junior dominance from 2005-2009 that saw them win five straight gold medals, Canada has only medaled three times in the last five years. This includes two straight years in which they did not medal. In 2013 they blew a third-period lead to Russia in the bronze-medal game and last year, in their least valiant effort in the last 10 years, lost a lopsided game to Finland in the semi-finals.
Once again, Canada’s roster looks poised to dominate the round-robin portion of the tournament. With top National Hockey League (NHL) draft picks like...

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