Friday, 06 March 2015, 9:57 am

Let’s be cereal about living well for a moment

KAITLYN ANDREWS
Columnist
I want to taco’ about life for a second here; it’s kind of a big dill.
Living healthy comes easy to me because I focus on four basic guidelines; eat what the earth gave me, get my heart pumping for 30 to 60 minutes or more a day, drink green tea and have a positive perspective.
I love fruits and vegetables so it’s natural for me to avoid sugar infested, calorie saturated, fat indulged and nutrient lacking foods. I love the taste of the earth. I can literally take a handful of raw kale and just shovel it in my mouth as if I were planting it.
I cook without salt and always look at labels before buying processed food.
When purchasing products that are not fresh from the produce aisle, if it has more than five ingredients in it, it’s probably not that good for you, as well as avoiding...

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How I lost faith in my media heroes

JACK FORD
Columnist
Brian Williams, Jian Ghomeshi and Leslie Roberts, now all part of media scandals.  SUBMITTED PHOTOSAs a journalist, it is my duty to tell you the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.
I take no celebrity in what I do, nor will I, because reporters are not actors, musicians, comedians or entertainers.
My demeanour in the newsroom is exactly how it should always be: proper, prepared and precise.
So when I see that three of my idols in the world of reporting all manage to lose their jobs because of lies, deceit, sexual misconduct and self-indulging behaviour, I begin to lose faith in my field.
And rightfully so, as I refer to the cases of NBC managing editor Brian Williams, Q on CBC host Jian Ghomeshi and Global News anchor Leslie Roberts.
These three men have managed to make my perception of the news one of complete doubt
There is no reason for unravelling your private life to save your own ass, nor reason to...

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Capturing life, letting go of doubt

JACK FORD
Columnist
This young staff writer (left) and his brother were never camera shy in their youth. PHOTO BY CINDY FORDPlease, no flash. It’s bad enough as it is.
When we were kids, we never looked at the camera and said, “God, I look awful.” Well, maybe some, but not all. Growing up, my Mom always took photos of her boys. My brother and I were almost too photogenic at times. It’s an era I look back on with a smile on my face. It was pre-digital, pre-filtered and no questions asked.
Every birthday, Christmas, even bathroom break was an opportunity to snap a funny or cute picture. And looking back on it, there’s no cause for concern. We were driving mini jeeps, peeing on garages, sledding down Superman Hill in Denistoun and loving every second of it, and so was Mom.
As the times passed, the photos became less and less frequent. In the advent of the personal digital camera, film became recorded on memory cards and thus killed...

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Students late because of transit

Carly McHUGH
Columnist
Once again, the Welland Transit bus is late to arrive at Brock University. PHOTO BY CARLY MCHUGHDaily routines have been of utmost importance since I started school. You can never keep your ride waiting.
My dad commandeered the morning ritual in our elementary and high school years. My brother and I would get the same shout to wake us up. I’d get myself up and ready while my brother hit the snooze button.
There was something about the idea of lateness that my dad didn’t like, and I grew to share that feeling.
Now that I’m a ‘responsible’ adult and have moved away from home, the thought of being late has become an anxiety trigger for me. Thus, I aim to keep myself as calm – and as time sensitive – as possible.
No matter how far away you live from your school or place of work, it’s always important to have some sort of routine. Luckily for me, I take a five-minute bus ride from my...

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Welland’s winter headache

KEVIN FARREL
Columnist
A snowmobile whizzes by on the Steve Bauer Trail in Welland. PHOTO BY KEVIN FARRELLIt’s winter. Sidewalks are hit and miss for being shoveled in Welland and that makes being a pedestrian an absolute nightmare.
As the roads are plowed, the snow isn’t reserved for a designated area.
Pedestrians face two options after significant snowfalls, you either get a sidewalk covered with the fresh white fluff, or you get no sidewalk at all as all the road snow is filling it.
Sometimes only one side of the road where a sidewalk used to exist becomes a snow mountain, but then you will get lucky; on the street’s other side the sidewalk will be partially cleared, emphasis on “partially”.
The sidewalks, if they are cleared at all, still have at least two to three inches of snow for someone walking to struggle through.
The equally frustrating options for winter pedestrians here come with either risking your life to walk on the road, or tread through thick snow,...

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Gamble on Canadian oil sands not paying out

JOEL OpHARDT
Columnist
Prime Minister Stephen Harper is trying to reverse the perception that his government has promoted resource extraction at the cost of manufacturing. SUBMITTED PHOTOCanada’s Great Wall is crumbling and its architect should be held accountable.
In 2006, the present federal government happily compared Canada’s oil sands to “the building of the Pyramids or China’s Great Wall.”
Believing that Canada has its place as an “energy superpower” in the 21st century, Prime Minister Stephen Harper has placed its chips on black, and gambled on our futures.
Until recently the bets paid off for Canadians. In the wake of the global recession, investors were hungry for the stability of the Canadian economy, but with the drop in oil prices and a stronger U.S. economy, fickle markets have turned their gaze further south.
Canada’s less than stellar prospects have only been reaffirmed by the recent interest rate cuts.
Stephen Poloz, Bank of Canada governor, dismissed any doubt that economic benefits from cheaper energy would outweigh the oil industry’s losses saying, “The drop in oil prices is unambiguously negative...

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When disaster flirts with you

TORI RUTHERFORD
Columnist
In the 21st century, part of being a young adolescent revolves around the consumption of alcohol. 
This does not apply to everyone, because it is possible to have fun without being under alcohol’s influence. 
But for those who do imbibe, going to your favourite bar or club is something to look forward to; unless you are a semi-attractive female who dislikes male attention.
As a young woman who ventures out with friends simply to have a good time rather than attract males’ attention, the club can be an uncomfortable feeling for me.
During past experiences I typically had a lot of male friends mixed in with my female friends and we would dance as a group. This deterred most unknown males from approaching my female friends and me so that we could dance freely without worry of being grabbed or groped.
I don’t know how things were at clubs before this generation...

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