Thursday, 23 October 2014, 5:09 am

Diabetes is on the rise

By LAITH KADHIM
Staff Writer
Halloween is fast approaching, but with the Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) estimating diabetes’ prevalence in 3.3 million Canadians and 1.46 million Ontarians, alternatives to sugary foods may be worth considering.
Maddy Easson, with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing, lists poor cholesterol, obesity, high blood pressure (which can lead to heart disease), Type 2 diabetes and kidney failure as some problems people encounter when ingesting high amounts of sugar regularly.
Stephanie McLaughlin, 22, of Niagara Falls, has had Type 1 diabetes since she was 12 years old. She attributes the early onset diabetes to the sudden change of diet when she became vegetarian.
McLaughlin takes her mandatory once-a-day needle, and a quick acting insulin pen after each meal. For fast absorption of insulin, the needle is injected in the stomach. For a slower absorption, the injection is made in the arm.
“I was actually more healthy after I got diabetes because...

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Fatigued students should analyze diet

By JILL BORDEN
Staff Writer
Every student has experienced it.
Many blame lack of sleep, lack of coffee in the morning or busy schedules.
While all this may be true, it’s likely related to your diet.
As students get back into the school routine, nutrition becomes a second thought as going from class to class limits time and attention to your body’s needs.
With morning classes, breakfast is most often skipped and replaced by a coffee and a muffin or bagel, lunches are skipped all together and dinners are overeaten.
“Skipping breakfast is really hard on the body,” said Joanna Cielen, a Wellness and Nutrition professor here and holistic nutritionist, “but [a coffee and a muffin] is the worst way to start your day because two things are happening: one, you’re loading your body with excessive carbohydrates and simple sugars, and two, you’re stimulating it with caffeine.”
This kind of breakfast is quick and on-the-go, but so deprived...

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The benefits of being a vegan

By LAITH KADHIM
Staff Writer
Restaurant owner Brian Gasbarini has a bite from his friend’s plate. PHOTO BY LAITH KADHIMShervin Saleh, homeopathic and holistic doctor at Doctor’s Naturae in Burlington, has been eating a vegan-based diet for 15 years. When he switched to a plant based diet he noticed an increase in energy, his digestive and joint issues subsided, so did his acne.
Owner of vegan restaurant Rise Above in St. Catharines, Brian Gasbarini explained.
“As soon as you become vegan, you start paying more attention to what the ingredients are in your food. You’ll be starting to notice ingredients that may not necessarily be animal products, but you’re just like what the heck is that? It sounds like some weird chemical, you look it up and it sounds like it has some sketchy side effects.”
Gasbarini has been vegan for nearly 13 years, inspired by vegan friends.
“I don’t believe we have the right to treat animals in this way, therefore, I’m not going to participate in it.”
Rise...

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Hundreds enjoy Lincoln’s annual Pioneer Days

By CAMILLE PASCO
Staff Writer
A Pioneer Days volunteer demonstrates proper craftsmanship with intricate designs.  PHOTO BY CAMILLE PASCOFolks of all ages travelled to Lincoln to remember the Pioneer Days and participate in historical activities.
On Oct. 4 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. families enjoyed hot fires and delicious foods to remember and learn about their history at Lincoln’s annual Pioneer Days.
Despite a cold and rainy day, hundreds of people shared laughs and stories of what life was like to be a pioneer. 
The event featured candlestick making, woodcarving, knitting, stitching and apple crushing.
“Take a seat pupils! Hurry up please, class is about to begin! Boys on the right, girls on the left,” shouted Philip Wonder, schoolteacher for the afternoon at Pioneer Days. 
He wore a historic suit and was perfectly indulging in the role of a stern, authentic schoolteacher.
Written on the chalkboard behind Wonder were a series of school rules, one read: “Take all punishment without an argument.” The classroom was set up exactly the...

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Allergic reaction prevention

By CARLY MCHUGH
Staff Writer
The main food allergies affecting Canadians are to peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish, fish, milk, eggs, wheat, soy and sesame. PHOTO BY CARLY MCHUGHThe risk of exposure to products that trigger allergies is present in any establishment preparing and distributing food. Restrictions on items such as peanuts and nut products are less common than in
the past.
Everyone remembers lunch in elementary school. The bell rings, backpacks are unzipped, and the feeling in your stomach when Mom packed your favourite peanut butter and jelly sandwich. A feeling otherwise good, but, with a risk of food allergies in the classroom, it was like smuggling heroin across the border.
Since those days, students have been integrated into an environment that acknowledges the risk of allergies, but also allows those without them to eat what they want.
Jessica Hendriks, a Child and Youth Worker student, has a severe peanut and nut allergy. She makes sure to be as careful as she can, but prevention of allergic reactions is a group effort.
“I have noticed a...

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SAC’s Yellow Umbrella is My Happy Place

By JUHYUNG PARK
Staff Writer
In the dark days of mental health illness, a Yellow Umbrella offers a protective haven.
The College Student Alliance (CSA), of which the Student Administrative Council (SAC) here is a member, has launched project Yellow Umbrella. It is a mental health awareness campaign.
The goal is to end the disgrace often associated with mental health issues, and raise awareness for mental health problems in the post-secondary education network.
In its outreach effort, SAC is holding a design contest called My Happy Place. The extended entry deadline was Monday.
Shane Malcolm, SAC president, said recognition of mental health issues has been rising in post-secondary institutions in the past two years for international and domestic students. Pressures and stress come from college demands and life events.
Malcolm said students have to take care of themselves because “they have to be here long enough to finish their college work.”
This contest is looking for...

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People in Niagara region have free access to meditation lessons, spiritual enlightenment

By COLIN KASPER
Staff Writer
Translator Montiri Putlek, 45, and Phra Tep Jetiyajarn, 94, offer their wisdom on how to achieve inner peace. PHOTO BY COLIN KASPERAre you stressed out and easily aggravated? Is your mind drifting off because you have a short attention span? Perhaps meditation is right for you.
   Samatha meditation translates to a tranquil concentration, making the mind calm and peaceful; it’s a simple and powerful technique anybody can learn.
   Samatha meditation can increase mind power, decrease stress, enhance
peacefulness, promote a happier and healthier lifestyle, improve
emotional, mental and physical well-being and enhance professional and academic performance.
     The Samatha meditation course has been developed by Phra Tep Jetiyajarn (Luangphor Viriyang Sirintharo), Lord Abbot of Dhammamongkol Temple in Bangkok, Thailand, master teacher of meditation with over 80 years of experience.
While he was in the Niagara region earlier this month, he appeared at the Willpower Institute Meditation Centre in Niagara Falls. Samatha meditation students had the rare chance to study his knowledge and become certified by...

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