Thursday, 02 October 2014, 4:20 am

People’s Climate March Toronto

By JOEL OPHARDT
Staff Writer
Mark Sherman holds a sign that reads, “Change Yourself, Change the World” as he marches in the People’s Climate March in Toronto. Photo by Joel OphardtThe message of the People’s Climate March in Toronto was directed squarely at the federal government, calling for an end to pipelines and oilsands production.
While a record 300,000 activists marched in New York City on Sunday to protest government inaction on climate change, Toronto’s smaller gathering of roughly 3,000 directed their frustration almost entirely at Canada’s dependence on the oil sector.
“I’ve been a political activist since women didn’t have the right to sign a mortgage or a credit card, or get a job that was any good,” said Judy Rebick, political activist and journalist, speaking to the crowd before the march. “Now we’re in a situation where Idle No More is now so powerful that it has the least democratic [federal] government we’ve ever had with its back against the wall, trying to figure out how the hell they’re going to get their pipeline through...

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One-mile walk for elephants and rhinos

By CAMILLE PASCO
Staff Writer
People in 1,160 cities worldwide, including Toronto, are joining the Global March for Elephants and Rhinos on Oct. 4 to raise awareness of their near extinction.
Studies by the March against Extinction show more than 1,000 Black African rhinos and more than 35,000 elephants are being slaughtered each year - rhinos for their horns and elephants for their tusks, which are carved into trinkets. Wildlife crime is estimated to generate $20 billion per year.
In efforts to stop these poaching crimes, the organization is asking the public to march one mile to represent the hundreds of miles elephants march in their range when they are left undisturbed.
Aside from the effort to raise funds for the animals on the one-mile walk, the hope is to make more people aware of their struggle for survival, to help put an immediate stop to the ivory and rhino horn trade, and for...

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Microsoft is getting personal

By JAKE CAMUS
and JACK FORD
Staff Writers
Microsoft is processing the future with a brand new operating system.
The company unveiled Windows 10 on Sept. 30 in San Francisco. A media briefing was hosted by Terry Myerson, executive vice-president of the
Operating Systems group.
During the briefing, Myerson said Windows 10 “will be our most comprehensive platform and will run on the broadest types of devices ever.”
After Myerson’s briefing, he introduced Corporate Vice-president Joe Belfiore to demonstrate the new system. Belfiore showcased the operating system functioning on multiple devices ranging from smartphones and tablets to desktop and laptop computers. “We’re trying to be thoughtful about a user interface that goes across all devices,” said Belfiore during his demo.
 Several new features to the system include a customizable start menu to be sized and organized to your preference. This includes a search bar capable of retrieving web content along with your files....

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Should federal government workers earn $15 an hour?

By KEVIN FARRELL
Staff Writer
Malcolm Allen’s office at 60 King St,, Welland  PHOTO BY KEVIN FARRELLThe week before Parliament resumed, Thomas Mulcair, federal Leader of the New Democratic Party (NDP) and the Official Opposition, proposed an increase of the minimum wage to $15 an hour for federal employees.
As the current minimum wage is $11, the headlines drew attention to the “for federal employees” aspect as one million workers fall under this category.
“Strong empirical evidence shows that increasing the minimum wage significantly decreases income inequality. The government’s own Federal Labour Standards Review recommended in 2006 that the federal government reinstate the federal minimum wage and benchmark it to Statistics Canada’s low-income cutoffs,” said Malcolm Allen, Welland
MP (NDP).
The NDP say the wage increase would start at $12 an hour gradually pushing to $15 by 2019.
“If the minimum wage rises, wouldn’t companies then cut jobs so they don’t, in the long run, lose out? Carry the wage up and squeeze people out...

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Kormos estate to provide 20 years of scholarships for Niagara

By JULIET KADZVITI
Staff Writer
Peter Kormos’ estate contributed $40,000 towards scholarships to Niagara College.
The donation will be spread out over the next 20 years. Each year, two students, one from the Social Services Worker program and another from the Law Clerk program, will receive a $1,000 scholarship.
Sean Kennedy, the college’s vice-president student and external relations, said that Niagara College was honoured to receive the donation.
“It was a great day when we got the call telling us that we would be receiving this gift from the Kormos estate.”
He said that the gift was special for two reasons. “First of all, it is a significant gift that will help many students, so that’s always terrific news. Secondly, he was a graduate of Niagara College and such a prominent member of the local community, particularly in Welland. He established such a tremendous legacy at Niagara College that we will forever honour.”
Kormos was...

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Don't deceive your eyes

By JILL BORDEN
Staff Writer
Eye discomfort is mainly caused by over-working your eyes. PHOTO BY JILL BORDENEye strain, headaches, gritty eyes and blurry vision are all side effects that may be caused by the reading and working done daily, also called near work.
Near work is any form of up close focusing work that is done by your eyes. Working on a computer, reading a book and playing on your smartphone are all
examples of near work and it could be causing discomfort when trying to accomplish everyday tasks.
“Anything that is within an arm’s length, the lens inside the eye needs to accommodate for focus,” said Dr. Lauryn Baerg, a St. Catharines optometrist, in an interview, “so your eyes have to work harder to do that focusing.”
The natural focal point of the human eye lies about 20 feet in front of the face, this is where the term 20/20 vision comes from.
“That’s how we measure vision, at a distance of 20...

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‘Hidden homeless’ not overlooked in Niagara

By CHRISTOPHER BREEN
Staff Writer
Maria Donato, the YWCA kitchen head, and her student volunteer, courtesy of St. Catharines Collegiate Co-Op Program, prepare food for the residents of the YWCA. PHOTOS BY CHRISTOPHER BREENJust because you can’t see the issue doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist.
Homelessness is growing in Canada and 80 per cent of it is off the radars. Hidden homeless make up most of what we define as homeless, but because they are hidden we don’t see them or the issues they face.
Society defines homeless as being (of a person) without a home, and typically living on the streets.
“We have this concept of homelessness as being the person you see sleeping on the grate or in a doorway,” said Elisabeth Zimmermann, executive director of the YWCA Niagara Region. “[But] that’s actually only a very, very small percentage, it’s about three to five per cent of actual homelessness.”
The Canadian Homelessness Research Network (CHRN) defines homelessness as the situation of an individual or family without stable, permanent, appropriate housing, or the immediate prospect, means and ability of acquiring it.
“Most...

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