Sunday, 25 January 2015, 7:14 pm

Nerds and Geeks of Niagara College looking for company

By MIRANDA BRUMWELL and KENDRA FERGUSON
Staff Writers
“If you like something ‘nerdy,’ you’re classified as one of us,” said Jason Mackay, Police Foundations student and member of the NC Nerds & Geeks.
With 97 members, the club members get together twice a week in the Learning Commons at the Welland Campus.
The president is General Arts & Sciences student Terrence Hill.
“We're a club that brings people together who have interests in geek culture, like comic books, anime, video games and more,” said Chelsea Morin, General Arts & Sciences student and vice president of NC Nerds & Geeks. “From discussions to gaming with one another, we're always communicating through our love for our geeky likes and hobbies. We do weekly activities like Anime Night every Thursday and Game Night every Friday.”
Mackay said there are different classifications of nerds and geeks. “Everyone nerds over something,” he said.
NC Nerds & Geeks will be...

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Welders: Artists with job prospects

By JAKE CAMUS
Staff Writer
Second-year Welding Technician students Josh Chretien and Ally Dutcher are ready to start their work before they enter the welding lab.  PHOTO BY JAKE CAMUSThe Welding Technician program at Niagara College isn’t the only option for a student looking to go into the trades. Like any other, however, they take pride in their work.
Welding student Ally Dutcher said, “We see ourselves as artists. Our work is an art and our craftsmanship says a lot about it.”
The Welding Technician program starts with the basics Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) training, learning how to use your machinery, adjusting the flow rate of gas, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), along with many other precautionary lessons. Welding technicians acknowledge that safety is  No. 1 priority and essential to learn first in the program.
Second-year student Josh Chretien provided an overview of his trade, what it’s all about and why it’s so important.
“We focus on a variety of different applications and welding processes. Some of these core processes include Oxy-fuel welding, Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW), Gas...

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Something about icewine

By JAMES MCALPINE
Staff Writer
CHCH reporter Nicole Martin crushing grapes during the 15th annual Niagara-on-the-Lake Ice Wine Harvest. PHOTO BY JAMES MCALPINEStudents, faculty and friends came out early and faced -16 °C weather to harvest grapes for icewine in what has become an annual tradition at the Niagara-on-the-Lake campus Food and Wine Institute.
Six a.m. on Jan. 13, roughly four dozen eager people awaited the beginning of the harvest at the college’s vineyards.
The harvest brought in enough to produce, as Canadian Food & Wine Institute faculty Thomas Schulz believes, about 300 litres of icewine, from approximately 600 kilograms of harvested grapes from the vineyard.
Described in an email from the college’s Communications Specialist Julie Greco as “liquid gold”, the 2014 harvest is expected to go on the shelves for sale at the institute this time next year according to Gavin Robertson, a former student of the Winery and Viticulture Technician program and now a faculty member at the institute.
First-year Winery and Viticulture Technician student Emma Smalley said there was a large...

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Parking etiquette chaotic on campus

By KEVAN DOWD
Staff Writer
Haphazard parking was a common at the Welland campus. The snowfall from Jan.13 led to confusion for drivers. PHOTO BY KEVAN DOWD                The Fall semester may be over, but winter certainly is not.
There is no question parking on campus is more difficult in the winter. Parking spaces are indistinguishable from each other due to snow-covered lines. This often results in what could only be called parking chaos.
Without visible lines, parking becomes guesswork for drivers. Vehicles end up crooked, blocking other vehicles, and spaced unevenly with many taking up multiple spots.
Community and Justice student, Kelly Clack, 37, has been parking on campus in Welland for two years and said, “They’re not parking very organized this year at all.” She said she has seen vehicles double-parked and even hitting each other in the lots.
Clack said she usually parks in lot D because there are never any spots in lot C.
“You’re just driving around aimlessly,” she said about trying to find parking.Mike Petrychanko, 35, a Peer Mentoring co-ordinator, disagrees and said...

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Hugging trees and saving paper

By BECKI CREWE
Staff Writer
At left, Gina Pannunzio and Taryn Wilkinson show all the kinds of paper that can be put into the paper recycle at the college’s waste receptacles. Some of these include: magazines, catalogues, newspapers, pizza boxes and coffee cup sleeves. PHOTO BY BECKI CREWETeddy bears may be more fun to hug than trees, but within three years, we’ve saved approximately 1.5 million on paper alone.
With a goal of reducing its 48 million sheets of internal paper consumption by 50 per cent, Niagara College has hit 40 per cent of its target in three years.
Pannunzio said when paper consumption started being tracked in 2009, the Sustainability Department realized 48 million is equal to 8.8 CN Towers stacked atop each other.
Pannunzio said the rough estimation of savings of 1.5 million is based on each sheet costing 10 cents to use. This included the cost for ink, packaging and other uses of the paper. To approach the cost savings with a general value, Pannunzio said it was based on each costing 10 cents per paper. Some paper does cost more than others, so she said this is just a general assumption.
Pannunzio said, “One...

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A grape way to un-wine-d

By JOHN BOUTILIER
Staff Writer
Kristen Cassidy with Riverview Winery shows off their rhubarb flavoured Cabernet Franc icewine. PHOTO BY JOHN BOUTILIERHistoric Queen Street in Niagara-on-the-Lake (NOTL) was host to the Niagara Icewine Festival last weekend and visitors got a taste of life in wine country.
“We made the trip out from Toronto to come and try a bunch of stuff,” said Alex Bunyan. “We came for the wine, but the food sampling is that extra little bit.”
Guests bought drink tokens for $3, with some drinks costing one or two tokens depending on quality.
“For the small amount you pay, it’s worth it,” said Jaclyn Ho. “We love the vibe here.”
Icewine is made with grapes that have been frozen while still on the vine. Usually a very risky process, the conditions of NOTL make for a great yield in production. 
“We had a good harvest this year, not too many problems at all,” said Sarah Forbes, a student in the Niagara College Winery and Viticulture program.
She described their 2010 Dean’s List...

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Documenting a national tragedy

By CHRISTOPHER BREEN
Staff Writer
Our Sisters in Spirit documentary team: (left to right, back row) Katie Hawton, camera assistant; Justin Buetter, cinematographer; Lindsay Pennett, second editor; (left to right, middle row) Matthew Fry, sound; Thomas Therrien, editor; (left to right, front row) Ashley Fava, producer; Taylor Warden-Ogilvie, sound; Nick Printup, director; Shannon Dalby, production assistant. SUBMITTED PHOTOA team of nine Niagara College broadcasting students has taken on the daunting task of producing a documentary on the national crisis facing Indigenous women. 
Our Sisters in Spirit explores the question of a national inquiry into Canada’s missing and murdered indigenous women.
A 22-page report by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police stated that since1980 there have been approximate 1,200 reported cases of Aboriginal women who were either missing or murdered. 
According to the Native Women’s Association of Canada that would be equivalent to 20,000 cases among non-indigenous women.
According to Amnesty International, a 2009 government survey of 10 provinces found that aboriginal women were nearly three times more likely than non-Aboriginal women to report being a victim of a violent crime.
The Royal Canadian Mount Police estimate that indigenous women make up only about 4.3 per cent of the female population in Canada but are four times more likely to be...

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