Thursday, 02 October 2014, 10:25 am

Seven billion runners in the human race

We are now seven billion humans.

On Oct. 31 Earth’s population is said to have reached seven billion.

Three countries claimed the birth of the seven-billionth baby happened in their country: Russia, India and the Philippines.

The world’s population has doubled since 1968.

Many great innovations have appeared throughout the world.

We have seen breakthroughs in medicine and genetics.

We have seen the advent of the Internet and the information age.

However, we’ve also seen pestilence, war and hunger.

Is the growing population a boon or hindrance? Can the world continue to support the ever-exploding populace?

We have seen the commercials, the starving children and the sickly families.

How many of the seven billion humans will die within years of their birth?

According to worldhunger.org, 925 million people are going hungry in the world. That is about 15 per cent.

Fifteen per cent of seven billion is a horrible number, but what happens as the population continues to grow? How many more will suffer?

If the growing population proves to be a problem, can there be a solution?

China recognized the downside of overpopulation and implemented a one-child policy years ago. It is clear such a law is a drastic measure and not something anyone in North America will ever have to suffer in the near future.

Our rights are protected, but there is little chance the birthrate will be controlled.

Is it possible that the booming population can have positive effects?

Greatness arises anywhere in the world.

Can we imagine an increasing population could lead to more great people who will rise to liberate nations, cure diseases or invent life-changing machines?

We expect to see future population growth. According to analysts, we will see eight billion people by 2025, and that number continues to grow exponentially afterwards.

We have handled the increase so far and, with a helping hand to our fellow man, perhaps we can see a promising future for any number of people.

JEREMY MEYERINK

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